Markdown Guide

What is Markdown?

pretalx often allows you to write Markdown instead of plain text, like in talk descriptions, the Call for Papers, and email texts. Markdown is helpful if you want to write text including links, bold text, and other formatted content. Markdown is a common option since it’s way easier to learn than languages like HTML but allows all basic formatting options required for text in those places.

Formatting rules

The following table shows the markdown syntax on the left, and the results are on the right:

Markdown Result
Please *please* keep the _deadline_.
Please please keep the deadline.
This is **important**.
This is important.
Print `this`.
Print this.
Look at https://pretalx.com.
Look at [this](https://pretalx.com.)

Look at https://pretalx.com.<br>

Look at this.

* First item
* Second item which is too long to
  fit in a line
* Third item
  • First item
  • Second item which is too long to fit in a line
  • Third item
1. First item
2. Second item which is too long to
   fit in a line
3. Third item
  1. First item
  2. Second item which is too long to fit in a line
  3. Third item
# Headline 1
## Headline 2
### Headline 3
#### Headline 4
##### Headline 5
###### Headline 6

Headline 1

Headline 2

Headline 3

Headline 4

Headline 5
Headline 6
*****

Using HTML

You can also directly embed HTML code, if you want, although we recommend using Markdown, as it enables e.g. people using text-based email clients to get a better plain text representation of your text. Note that for security reasons you can use the following HTML elements, and no others:

a, abbr, acronym, b, br, code, div, em, h1, h2,
h3, h4, h5, h6, hr, i, li, ol, p, pre, span, strong,
table, tbody, td, thead, tr, ul

You can use the following attributes:

<a href="…" title="…">
<abbr title="…">
<acronym title="…">
<table width="…">
<td width="…" align="…">
<div class="…">
<p class="…">
<span class="…">

pretalx will strip all other elements and attributes during parsing.